Northanger Abbey (Jane Austen)

>>>>>  Nº 23 on My 2015 Reading Challenge – A book that’s more than 100-years-old <<<<<

northangerabbey

During an eventful season at Bath, young, naïve Catherine Morland experiences the joys of fashionable society for the first time. She is delighted with her new acquaintances: flirtatious Isabella, who shares Catherine’s love of Gothic romance and horror, and sophisticated Henry and Eleanor Tilney, who invite her to their father’s mysterious house, Northanger Abbey. There, her imagination influenced by novels of sensation and intrigue, Catherine imagines terrible crimes committed by General Tilney. With its broad comedy and irrepressible heroine, this is the most youthful and and optimistic of Jane Austen’s works.

Although I did not enjoyed it as much as Pride and Prejudice, I still very much loved Northanger Abbey. It’s not however an easy read – actually I think I had more trouble reading this one than the former. Jane Austen’s writing style is in fact all over the place in this book, and that’s why it took me way too long to read just 230 pages (12 days… shame on me!)… And to think that this was my original book for the A book you can finish in a day spot on my 2015 Reading Challenge!

I really liked Catherine Morland as the heroine of this story, and her exchanges with Henry Tilney were delightful. The Thorpes I just wanted to kick all the time – not likable at all, and I have to say that between Isabella and John, I think John might be the less obnoxious.

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The 2007 TV movie adaptation with Felicity Jones and JJ Feild is great, and I couldn’t help but imagine them both while I was reading the book, Felicity Jones’ expressions are just so on point!

Rating: 3.8 Stars

3-8

14 thoughts on “Northanger Abbey (Jane Austen)

  1. impossiblegirl123 says:

    I love Northanger Abbey, but you are right, it’s not an easy read. Did you know that despite it being the last book published from Austen, it was the first one she wrote? That might explain why her writing style is better in the other books.

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