Book Traveling Thursdays: Not My Genre, But I Loved It

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Hello, welcome back to another Book Traveling 168709Thursdays, which a weekly meme created by Cátia @The Girl Who Read Too Much and Danielle @Danielle’s Book Blog. The goal is to share the covers of a book related to that week’s theme, which you can see at the Goodreads group, indicating the original cover, the one of your country, your favorite and least favorite.

This week’s theme is “Choose a book from a genre that you don’t read that often but loved anyway”. I’m going with You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) by Felicia Day, which is non-fiction, and an autobiography, which are two genres I don’t read that often. I loved this book so much!


Original & Favorite COver:

I love this cover. Felicia looks so pretty here 😀 .

LEAST FAVORITE COVER(S):

This is the Czech edition, and it’s not that I don’t like it… I just don’t like it as much as the original one.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood (Trevor Noah)

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The compelling, inspiring, and comically sublime story of a young man’s coming-of-age, set during the twilight of apartheid and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed

Trevor Noah is one of the comedy world’s brightest new voices, a light-footed but sharp-minded observer of the absurdities of politics, race, and identity, sharing jokes and insights drawn from the wealth of experience acquired in his relatively young life. As host of The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, he provides viewers in America and around the globe with their nightly dose of biting satire, but here Noah turns his focus inward, giving readers a deeply personal, heartfelt, and humorous look at the world that shaped him.

Noah was born a crime, the son of a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother, at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. Living proof of his parents’ indiscretion, Trevor was kept mostly indoors for the first years of his life, bound by the extreme and often absurd measures his mother took to hide him from a government that could, at any moment, take him away. Finally liberated by the end of South Africa’s white rule, Trevor and his mother set forth on a grand adventure, living openly and freely and embracing the opportunities won by a centuries-long struggle. 

A collection of eighteen personal essays, Born a Crime tells the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist. Born a Crime is equally the story of that young man’s fearless, rebellious, and fervently religious mother — a woman determined to save her son from the cycle of poverty, violence, and abuse that ultimately threatens her own life. 

Whether subsisting on caterpillars for dinner during hard times, being thrown from a moving car during an attempted kidnapping, or just trying to survive the life-and-death pitfalls of dating in high school, Noah illuminates his curious world with an incisive wit and an unflinching honesty. His stories weave together to form a moving and searingly funny portrait of a lovable delinquent making his way through a damaged world in a dangerous time, armed with only a keen sense of humor and a mother’s unconventional, unconditional love.


I first paid attention to Trevor Noah when he started being a correspondent on The Daily Show, and I loved him, so I was super happy when he got the gig and made it to the front desk on the show. So, when I saw a book on netgalley with his face, I just clicked “request”, eheh, without even knowing much of what it was about. Man… I’m glad I miraculously got approved for this one.

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After starting the book – and reading the title a little better – I realized that the focus of this one would be about Trevor’s life in South Africa, mainly during his childhood and the consequences of the apartheid. In case you don’t know what apartheid was, it was a system of racial segregation in South Africa enforced through legislation from 1948 to 1994.

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I don’t think most of us outside segregated countries can actually understand how a system like this would be, so while reading, and knowing beforehand about all of this – my mom DOES live in AfricaI was still shocked and saddened by the whole situation.

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I think that Trevor was able to explain the system pretty well, especially how it was for him being a mixed child, because mixed children weren’t supposed to exist during apartheid… it was forbidden by law for white and black people to have intimate relations, and a mixed child was proof of exactly that, a crime!

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It was really interesting to read about Trevor’s life and about his hurricane of a mother. Seriously people, his mom MADE him. It’s impressive, so impressive, and there is no doubt in my mind that the way she raised him and pushed him, brought him to where he is today.

At the same time, while telling a very serious story of segregation, poverty, etc, the book is also funny as hell. Trevor Noah writes the way he talks, so there’s humour everywhere, even in the most dire situations. And Trevor’s humour is awesome, even if inappropriate at times, eheh. I had a fit of laughter inside a plane, because of one particular even when he was about 5 years old… yeah… that was hilarious!

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This was an excellent biography, I just had a couple of problems (small ones) about it. First of all, the book starts out strong, and then it gets confusing. This happens because it goes back and forth in time a couple of times, which happens a lot in memoirs, but here it took me a bit to get a grip on it, and it seemed like it could go through another round of editing, maybe?! Because it felt like it was all over the place for awhile… I don’t know… it felt a bit off in the beginning, but then the book gained speed and I loved it.

Another issue I had, and this has very little to do with the book itself, is the fact that it covers very little from Trevor Noah’s adult life. I wished that his transition from DJ to stand up was covered, or even mentioned, but it’s not. Several events occur when he’s already doing stand up all over the world, but there’s no “so, this is how it came to be” moment, and I missed that.

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Overall, this was an excellent biography, with a huge focus on the South African society during and post-Apartheid. It also focus a lot on the issue of belonging, related to the effects of the segregation. I think this is such an important read! I honestly have to recommend it to everyone, whether or not you love Trevor Noah, you should read it. He talks about a reality that I think most people are not truly aware of, so read this, get informed, laugh a bit while doing it. Have fun while learning :D.

Read this one!

You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) (Felicia Day)

From online entertainment mogul, actress, and “queen of the geeks” Felicia Day, a funny, quirky, and inspiring memoir about her unusual upbringing, her rise to Internet-stardom, and embracing her individuality to find success in Hollywood.

The Internet isn’t all cat videos. There’s also Felicia Day — violinist, filmmaker, Internet entrepreneur, compulsive gamer, hoagie specialist, and former lonely homeschooled girl who overcame her isolated childhood to become the ruler of a new world…or at least semi-influential in the world of Internet Geeks and Goodreads book clubs. 

After growing up in the south where she was “homeschooled for hippie reasons”, Felicia moved to Hollywood to pursue her dream of becoming an actress and was immediately typecast as a crazy cat-lady secretary. But Felicia’s misadventures in Hollywood led her to produce her own web series, own her own production company, and become an Internet star. 

Felicia’s short-ish life and her rags-to-riches rise to Internet fame launched her career as one of the most influential creators in new media. Now, Felicia’s strange world is filled with thoughts on creativity, video games, and a dash of mild feminist activism—just like her memoir. 

Hilarious and inspirational, You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) is proof that everyone should embrace what makes them different and be brave enough to share it with the world, because anything is possible now—even for a digital misfit.


I don’t think I can express adequately how much I loved this book… I loved it a lot!

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I was roaming through my audible account one day, when I realized that Felicia Day’s book was already out, and that the audiobook was read by her, with a preface by Joss Whedon?! OMG, why the hell hadn’t I buy it already?! I did that as soon as I got home (a.k.a. WIFI!) and then I started to listen to this masterpiece.

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Felicia’s life story is funny, weird, relatable, sad and amazing. It’s incredible, really, to listen to all these things that happened in her life, her successes, her insecurities, her troubles, depressions,… I laughed out loud, and cried my eyes out with this book, and at the end of it, I has a newfound respect for a person that I already had loads of respect and admiration for. Felicia Day is a Queen! She’s so smart and talented, and yet so vulnerable, … I love her a hell of a lot more now!

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(again, so relatable!)

It also, finally, made me start to watch The Guild, I’m already finishing season 4…

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(and inspiring!)

I would recommend this book to everyone. I loved the audiobook, Felicia has a special way of talking too fast that is just adorable and totally hers. But I do intend to buy the physical copy of this book, because I found it so inspiring, relatable, fascinating and weirdly awesome. Somehow, I feel like I know her better, almost like a friend (but not those creeps who stalked her, ok?).

Rating: 5 Stars

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*images modified from glommable

Bossypants (Tina Fey)

>>>>  Nº 14 on My 2015 Reading Challenge – A non-fiction book <<<<

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Before Liz Lemon, before “Weekend Update,” before “Sarah Palin,” Tina Fey was just a young girl with a dream: a recurring stress dream that she was being chased through a local airport by her middle-school gym teacher. She also had a dream that one day she would be a comedian on TV.

She has seen both these dreams come true.

At last, Tina Fey’s story can be told. From her youthful days as a vicious nerd to her tour of duty on Saturday Night Live; from her passionately halfhearted pursuit of physical beauty to her life as a mother eating things off the floor; from her one-sided college romance to her nearly fatal honeymoon—from the beginning of this paragraph to this final sentence.

Tina Fey reveals all, and proves what we’ve all suspected: you’re no one until someone calls you bossy.

(Includes Special, Never-Before-Solicited Opinions on Breastfeeding, Princesses, Photoshop, the Electoral Process, and Italian Rum Cake!)

I’ve actually owned the physical copy of this book for a few months now, but knowing that I wouldn’t get to it for a while, it went ahead to Portugal (with most of my precious). But the other day I was surfing through Audible (to see if a subscription might be worth it), and I wasn’t really sure if audiobooks were for me… (actually I decided that not so much, except for autobiographies!)

I listened to an excerpt of Bossypants, narrated by the author, the amazing Tina Fey, and I knew I NEEDED to listen to it. I was not in the least sorry. I started to listen to it right there, at work, and I started to laugh (loudly) by myself. I only paused to have diner (I needed to watch some Daily Show), and then I was back at it. The 5 hours and something flew by and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

It’s the best decision I made in regards to this book, listening to Tina Fey telling it was just like I was watching an interview with her, or some other funny stuff with her. I love her and her work, so I just kept enjoying it :D.

It’s still an autobiography, which are not in any way my kind of books. And that’s why I won’t rate this higher…

(and now I have this huge overwhelming desire to watch all seasons of 30 Rock for the third time…)

Rating: 4 Stars

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