Could You Love An Apple? (Becky Jerams)

Taylor Raven is starting over.

After a few difficult college years, he has decided to finally move away from Havensdale (and away from his father) to take a tennis coaching course in the tiny village of Westerfield.

The peaceful country life is exactly what Taylor needs to get away from it all. However, it is also incredibly lonely living by himself in the middle of nowhere. And no matter how far he runs, Taylor just can’t seem to escape the mistakes of his past.

As he struggles to find any kind of meaningful connection, he comes across a place on the outskirts of the village that will soon change everything. The Apple Inn – a pub run by a curious, slightly eccentric family who welcome Taylor into their world with open arms.

Soon Taylor finds his guard dropping, particularly around the kind and fun-loving son of the family, Benjamin Apple. But the closer Taylor gets, the more he feels compelled to pull away…

Can Taylor ever fall in love again when the one obstacle in his way… is himself?


Hey guys! I don’t know if you remember – it was along time ago – but I read the first book of this series a while back, Reasons to Love a Nerd Like Me, and I really enjoyed it at the time. So when Becky Jerams asked me if I wanted to read and review the sequel, I of course said yes. But I have to say, even though I did like the theme of the story and the overall plot, I had some major problems with the characters, some actions, and most of all, some things said within the book. I’ll try to explain the best I can, without giving it much away, ok?

This book follows Taylor, who was a very important character in book 1 of this series, as in, he was Scotty’s first love and also his bully. Taylor does have a transformative arc in the first book, and he regrets what he did to Scotty immensely, and they are even able to get past it and become good friends. While I liked his arc on the first book, the friendship was something that was always just a bit too much for me, but I rolled with it.

Now, a couple of years later, Taylor is trying to rebuild his life distant from his toxic father, and far away from the town he grew up with, and acted horrible. While trying to keep his distance from everyone, he ends up meeting the Apples and he forges a relationship with Benjamin, and the two of them face a lot of problems and setbacks to be able to be together.

My first huge problem with this book was how unlikable I found Taylor. He was already not easy to love due to his past, but even understanding his issues and knowing where he’s coming from, it was kind of hard for me to like Taylor when he was treating people terribly. This was sort of mild when he was trying to keep people away from him, but there’s a point in the book when he says horrible things to Benjamin, and while I understand that Taylor has some serious issues, he did believe the things he said and I don’t think they’re excusable.

With that said, I did like Taylor’s growth. He goes through some major things in this book, and he’s overall trying to be a better person, and he is. I really liked Benjamin though, even if I’m not sure he was always a consistent character.

This romance develops kind of slow, and for the most part, I liked Taylor and Benj together, they were so different that they kind of balanced each other out. I also liked the overall story and plot, so that was a major point FOR the book. But the relationship does go through a lot of stuff, and I didn’t think they were all necessary, to be honest.

Now, my major, and I mean MAJOR issue with this book was the homophobic language and messages. I found this extremely problematic.

The first thing that truly bothered me came from Taylor himself, a gay character, when he insinuates that being topped during sex is somehow bad, or would make him somehow LESS. That it would be a source of shame. I do understand that Taylor has not come to terms with his sexuality completely and lives with some huge hangups, but the whole language and situation were just wrong. And while he later sort of understands that he’s not “less of a man” for it, I still felt like that wasn’t enough to make up for all the hate speech done earlier.

One other thing was the homophobic language and stereotyping done by some secondary characters. Homophobic people will always exist and ignorant people too, but the impact wouldn’t be so huge if the characters had less dialogue page time, because they were really not important. Most of those comments were not necessary and didn’t contribute to the story at all, so they weren’t useful at all, and they made me seriously dislike this book.

Finally, I have to talk about the writing and the pacing. One of my issues with the first book was its length, and at the time I thought that book 1 could have used some editing, because it dragged on a bit. I have to be honest and say that I felt like this one dragged even more. It took me a long long time to get through it. And I also wasn’t a huge fan of the way the more intimate scenes were written, and I didn’t feel like there was a seamless flow, you know?

Either way, to sum it up a bit, because I do realize that the last few paragraphs have been kind of negative… I did like the story and some of the characters, especially the Apples. I saw a huge potential in the plot, but I couldn’t totally enjoy it due to the issues mentioned above. Not really liking the MC is a huge issue for me, and that along with everything else, didn’t make for a very enjoyable reading experience.

April TBR

Hello people! I think I did super well on last month’s TBR, I ended up reading 20 books last month, and most of them were on my TBR 🙂 . But this month I’m anticipating I’ll have a little less time for reading, so I’m keeping my March TBR small.

  1. Could You Love An Apple? (Love Stories #2) by Becky Jerams – I actually just finished this one, but it took me such a long time…
  2. Twist by Kylie Scott
  3. Daisy and the Front Man (Backstage Pass #3) by Rebekah L. Purdy
  4. Dancing in the Rain by Kelly Jamieson
  5. The Butterfly Project by Emma Scott
  6. The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle #1) by Maggie Stiefvater
  7. Mixed Up by Emma Hart
  8. Girl out of Water by Laura Silverman
  9. Pipe Dreams by Sarina Bowen
  10. Noteworthy by Riley Redgate
  11. Making Faces by Amy Harmon – I hope we can get to this one this month

March TBR

marchtbr

Last month I had a huge TBR, but I managed to read 15 books, and most of the books were ARCs, so that was cool. I’m lowering my TBR for this month, but hoping to still manage to include a few more reads.

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  1. A Boy Like You by Ginger Scott –  I actually started this one yesterday and it’s heartbreaking and beautiful so far
  2. Twisted Palace by Erin Watt
  3. The Inexplicable Logic of My Life by Benjamin Alire Sáenz – I started this one, because it will take me a long time to read it… stupid protected pdfs…
  4. Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde
  5. Egomaniac by Vi Keeland – Weak moment yesterday, and I started this audiobook while carrying my luggage around, and then I finished it before I went to sleep…
  6. Sugar, We’re Going Down by M. H. Soars
  7. Goodnight, Nic by Marley Jacobs
  8. Goodbye Paradise (Hello Goodbye #1) by Sarina Bowen
  9. Goodbye Days by Jeff Zentner
  10. Operation Prom Date (Tactics in Dating, #1) by Cindi Madsen
  11. Making Faces by Amy Harmon
  12. Could You Love An Apple? (Love Stories #2) by Becky Jerams
  13. Definitions of Indefinable Things by Whitney Taylor
  14. Optimists Die First by Susin Nielsen

Top Ten Tuesday: 8 Books I Feel Differently About Now

top 10 tuesday

Hello, welcome back to another Tuesday. Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme is:

Ten Books I Feel Differently About After Time Has Passed (less love, more love, complicated feelings, indifference, thought it was great in a genre until you became more well read in that genre etc.)

So here it is, 8 books that I feel a little different about now than when I read them.


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Reasons to Love a Nerd Like Me (Becky Jerams)

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Scotty Williams is the nerdiest 17-year-old at UK-based Havensdale College – and proud of it. However being a nerd can have its downsides, particularly when you’re constantly being targeted by the school bully Taylor Raven and his cronies.

As Scotty tries to navigate his final college years with the aid of his best friend Olive, he also finds himself on the radar of the mysterious and intimidating Vincent Hunter, toughest guy in the Sixth Form. Is Vincent really as bad as he seems? Will Scotty’s darkest secret ever be revealed? Can he ever just finish his last few college years in peace? But most importantly… will any guy ever find the reasons to love a nerd like him?


I didn’t know exactly what I was expecting from this book, but this was not it! And that’s a good thing, oh, such a good thing. I will admit that it took me a bit to actually understand where I stood in the story, not being familiar at all with the british school system, it took me a while. It was also a challenge to familiarize myself with all the british slur and that kind of stuff, but I got there 😉 .

The writing is pretty impressive, it really surprised me how easily I ended up going through the 500+ pages of this book.

I really liked most of the characters. Scotty was pretty amazing, in all of his imperfections. I loved that he was who he was and that he was sure and confided in his own skin. And even if I wanted to bludge his head with something for most of the time, I do understand why he did what he did, and why he kept all the secrets. Ollie got on my nerves sometimes, mostly because she fluctuated too much between being too much of a grown-up and too much of a kid, and I had a really hard time pegging her as a 17 yo. She was a great friend to Scotty though, and I appreciated how their friendship was built.

I absolutely loved Vincent and I was swooning for the guy most of the time. His relationship with Scotty was kind of perfect and I really loved that he didn’t really care about what people thought. While with his best-friend, Alexis, I had a similar problem as with Ollie: I liked her, but she got on my nerves sometimes… her reaction to what her interpretation of the truth was was awful, she didn’t even think about things before she started to bully Scotty, it was just not right at all.

Now for the bully, Taylor, it really took me surprise the real reason why he did what he did, and even after I knew it, and I kind of understood it, his cold reactions and violent behaviour while they were alone still baffled me a bit. I did like his ending, and I’m kind of curious to read his story 🙂 .

I really liked the plot and all its elements, but I do think that the book could have been shortened. As much as I liked seeing Scotty and Vincent’s relationship blossom, I do think it could have come a little faster. The same with their fallout, it was bound to happen, and it was terrible – my heart was hurting all that time – but it could have come and been resolved faster.

I obviously liked the ending, though the fact that Scotty and Vincent not only forgave, but became friends with Taylor kind of put me off. I understand the forgiving part, and I applaud it, but hanging out with the guy that bullied you for over a year… I don’t know…

Also, I applaud that Becky Jerams was bold enough not only to include sex in the novel, but to include explicit M/M sex. I APPLAUD YOU!