The Inexplicable Logic of My Life (Benjamin Alire Sáenz)

From the multi-award-winning author of Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe comes a gorgeous new story about love, identity, and families lost and found.

Sal used to know his place with his adoptive gay father, their loving Mexican-American family, and his best friend, Samantha. But it’s senior year, and suddenly Sal is throwing punches, questioning everything, and realizing he no longer knows himself. If Sal’s not who he thought he was, who is he? This humor-infused, warmly humane look at universal questions of belonging is a triumph.


You know when you request a book on Netgalley and you’re so sure you’ll be denied for it? Yeah… After reading and loving Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, I was pretty damn excited to be able to read an ARC of the new Benjamin Alire Sáenz book, The Inexplicable Logic of My Life.

The first thing that stood out for me on this book, were the chapters. This book consists of short (and some longer) scenes, and each of these scenes are basically chapters. They are each an important moment between the characters. And the titles describe what we’re about to read, like this:

I absolutely loved this formating and the way the story was told. I was reading this when I was also reading A Boy Like You and the chapter’s lenght couldn’t have been more different, eheh. I really really liked these short and very on point chapters. It made the book go super fast for me.

The second thing to note is that the writing is just magical. MAGICAL!!! I had loved Ari and Dante‘s writing, but I fell in love with the writing on this book.

This book is purely character driven, which are my favorite kind, to be honest, and it deals with love and family and friendship. And loss and how to deal with it. How to confront fears. The feeling of belonging somewhere or to someone. And what weights more, nature or nurture.

The story is mostly about Salvador and his two friends, Sam, who has been his best friend since he was little, and Fito. All of them go through some pretty heavy stuff during the book, and they’re all so different, it warmed my heart the depth of their love for one another. They also grow up so much during the book, and they support each other through it all.

I really liked the Sal, Sam and Fito and the relationships they shared. They each had their own personality and quirks, and they tried to make each other better.

Also, it should be noted that there’s no romance in this book, at least not with our 3 main characters, and that was a relief, because I truly thought that there would be, and it wouldn’t feel natural.

But I think that my favorite person in this book was Vicente, Sal’s adoptive dad and a father figure to all the teens. He was just such a great person, who tried to show the best ways to the kids, but never impose his view, and instead let them reach their own conclusions. He was also always there for all of them, and he had a special bond with each of them. I loved him!

I have to mention that I saw a few critiques to this book, mainly to the use of some expressions used, either ableists or heavy on the stereotypes. I saw them. But I have to say that they didn’t feel out of place to me, and I felt that there was a narrative in the story, with the growth of the characters, that pulled them away from such narrow minded views.

Well… I loved this book, I think I even liked it more than Ari and Dante. I loved the writing and the characters. I loved the story and the growth. I loved that it made me cry like a baby each time I read more than two sentences.

I would highly recommend it, from my experience reading.

But if you’re in doubt, maybe check out some other reviews and see how you feel about the problematic aspects that those reviews point out.

March TBR

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Last month I had a huge TBR, but I managed to read 15 books, and most of the books were ARCs, so that was cool. I’m lowering my TBR for this month, but hoping to still manage to include a few more reads.

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  1. A Boy Like You by Ginger Scott –  I actually started this one yesterday and it’s heartbreaking and beautiful so far
  2. Twisted Palace by Erin Watt
  3. The Inexplicable Logic of My Life by Benjamin Alire Sáenz – I started this one, because it will take me a long time to read it… stupid protected pdfs…
  4. Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde
  5. Egomaniac by Vi Keeland – Weak moment yesterday, and I started this audiobook while carrying my luggage around, and then I finished it before I went to sleep…
  6. Sugar, We’re Going Down by M. H. Soars
  7. Goodnight, Nic by Marley Jacobs
  8. Goodbye Paradise (Hello Goodbye #1) by Sarina Bowen
  9. Goodbye Days by Jeff Zentner
  10. Operation Prom Date (Tactics in Dating, #1) by Cindi Madsen
  11. Making Faces by Amy Harmon
  12. Could You Love An Apple? (Love Stories #2) by Becky Jerams
  13. Definitions of Indefinable Things by Whitney Taylor
  14. Optimists Die First by Susin Nielsen

Latest NetGalley Approvals (that made me feel accomplished as a blogger!)

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One of the first things I did when I became a book blogger, was signing up for Netgalley. I went into a frenzy at the beginning and requested a bunch of books that was sure I wouldn’t get, but some time has passed, and after 197 approvals and 103 denials, I have some sense of the books I’m going to get approved or not as soon as I request them. I still request them even if I think I won’t be, because miracles do happen, right?

So, I thought I would share with you some of the books I was approved for lately that really made me feel “oh wow, I guess I accomplished something as a blogger!“.

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The Inexplicable Logic of My Life by Benjamin Alire Saenz was one of my latest requests on NG, and I was SURE I wouldn’t get approved for it. I read Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe in 2015 and really enjoyed it, so I was ecstatic when I got the approval email.

Sal used to know his place with his adoptive gay father, their loving Mexican-American family, and his best friend, Samantha. But it’s senior year, and suddenly Sal is throwing punches, questioning everything, and realizing he no longer knows himself. If Sal’s not who he thought he was, who is he?


You’re Welcome, Universe by Whitney Gardner was another one I requested with a certainty that it would come my way. Mostly because it has been in everyone’s lists for awaited diverse reads, and when a book is that hyped right off the bat, it’s really tough to get eARCs from it.

When Julia finds a slur about her best friend scrawled across the back of the Kingston School for the Deaf, she covers it up with a beautiful (albeit illegal) graffiti mural. 

Her supposed best friend snitches, the principal expels her, and her two mothers set Julia up with a one-way ticket to a “mainstream” school in the suburbs, where she’s treated like an outcast as the only deaf student. The last thing she has left is her art, and not even Banksy himself could convince her to give that up.

Out in the ’burbs, Julia paints anywhere she can, eager to claim some turf of her own. But Julia soon learns that she might not be the only vandal in town. Someone is adding to her tags, making them better, showing off — and showing Julia up in the process. She expected her art might get painted over by cops. But she never imagined getting dragged into a full-blown graffiti war.

Told with wit and grit by debut author Whitney Gardner, who also provides gorgeous interior illustrations of Julia’s graffiti tags, You’re Welcome, Universe introduces audiences to a one-of-a-kind protagonist who is unabashedly herself no matter what life throws in her way.


Definitions of Indefinable Things by Whitney Taylor was yet another one that I thought was a long shot, and I can’t wait to delve into it.

This heartbreaking, humorous novel is about three teens whose lives intersect in ways they never expected.

Reggie Mason is all too familiar with “the Three Stages of Depression.” She believes she’s unlocked the secret to keeping herself safe: Nobody can hurt you if you never let them in. 

Reggie encounters an unexpected challenge to her misanthropy: a Twizzler-chomping, indie film-making narcissist named Snake. Snake’s presence, while reassuring, is not exactly stable—especially since his ex-girlfriend is seven months pregnant. As Reggie falls for Snake, she must decide whether it’s time to rewrite the rules that have defined her.


Noteworthy by Riley Redgate just sounded so interesting that I couldn’t resist asking for it. I didn’t read her previous novel, but I heard good things about it.

It’s the start of Jordan Sun’s junior year at the Kensington-Blaine Boarding School for the Performing Arts. Unfortunately, she’s an Alto 2, which — in the musical theatre world — is sort of like being a vulture in the wild: She has a spot in the ecosystem, but nobody’s falling over themselves to express their appreciation. So it’s no surprise when she gets shut out of the fall musical for the third year straight.

Then the school gets a mass email: A spot has opened up in the Sharpshooters, Kensington’s elite a cappella octet. Worshiped … revered … all male. Desperate to prove herself, Jordan auditions in her most convincing drag, and it turns out that Jordan Sun, Tenor 1, is exactly what the Sharps are looking for.


Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde. I fell in love with the title and the cover, before I even read the blurb or started seeing the book on diverse books lists. So glad they approved me.

When BFFs Charlie, Taylor and Jamie go to SupaCon, they know it’s going to be a blast. What they don’t expect is for it to change their lives forever. 

Charlie likes to stand out. SupaCon is her chance to show fans she’s over her public breakup with co-star, Jason Ryan. When Alyssa Huntington arrives as a surprise guest, it seems Charlie’s long-time crush on her isn’t as one-sided as she thought.

While Charlie dodges questions about her personal life, Taylor starts asking questions about her own.

Taylor likes to blend in. Her brain is wired differently, making her fear change. And there’s one thing in her life she knows will never change: her friendship with Jamie—no matter how much she may secretly want it to. But when she hears about the Queen Firestone SupaFan Contest, she starts to rethink her rules on playing it safe.


Goodbye Days by Jeff Zentner. I haven’t read his previous book, but Kat loved it, and I trust in her opinion. So when this book showed up on Netgalley, I requested it, and then I requested it again (one of those requests was denied…).

Can a text message destroy your life?

Carver Briggs never thought a simple text would cause a fatal crash, killing his three best friends, Mars, Eli, and Blake. Now Carver can’t stop blaming himself for the accident and even worse, there could be a criminal investigation into the deaths.

Then Blake’s grandmother asks Carver to remember her grandson with a ‘goodbye day’ together. Carver has his misgivings, but he starts to help the families of his lost friends grieve with their own memorial days, along with Eli’s bereaved girlfriend Jesmyn. But not everyone is willing to forgive. Carver’s own despair and guilt threatens to pull him under into panic and anxiety as he faces punishment for his terrible mistake. Can the goodbye days really help?


So guys, have you been approved for any of these? Are you excited for any of them?

In your time requesting ARCs, was there any you got that you thought “YAY, I MADE IT“?!

Books With LGBT+ Characters

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Hello people! This is Pride Month, so I thought it was about time to do a post about some of the books I read which had LGBT+ main characters, secondary (important) characters and/or dealt with LGBT issues.


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Top Ten Tuesday: 8 Books I Feel Differently About Now

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Hello, welcome back to another Tuesday. Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme is:

Ten Books I Feel Differently About After Time Has Passed (less love, more love, complicated feelings, indifference, thought it was great in a genre until you became more well read in that genre etc.)

So here it is, 8 books that I feel a little different about now than when I read them.


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Book Traveling Thursdays: A Diverse Book

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Hello, welcome back to another Book Traveling 168709Thursdays, which a weekly meme created by Cátia @The Girl Who Read Too Much and Danielle @Danielle’s Book Blog. The goal is to share the covers of a book related to that week’s theme, which you can see at the Goodreads group, indicating the original cover, the one of your country, your favorite and least favorite.

This week’s theme is “Everyone loves Diverse Books. Choose your favorite diverse book“. I’m going to go with “A diverse book”, because my first two choices have just the one cover. So, I’ll pick Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz. I really liked this book, it’s a coming of age story, and the two main characters are of mexican descent. The books deals with not only racial issues, but with homosexuality as well. Great read, have you read it? You should!


Original & Favorite COver:

I absolutely love this cover, actually, I bought this book BECAUSE of this gorgeous cover…

COVER FROM MY COUNTRY (PORTUGAL) & COVER FROM THE COUNTRY I LIVE IN (SPAIN):

I could only find the spanish cover, I guess this book is not available in portuguese yet… not exactly news, unfortunately.

LEAST FAVORITE COVER(s):

                          

First off, I would like to say how surprised I am that the russian edition didn’t make the cut this week!!! So, first we have the Italian cover, which is possible the worst cover that EVER existed… seriously, look at it!!! The we have the German one, and I almost like it, but ultimately it just doesn’t even compare to the original one. Finally we have the Swedish and my problem with it is, who the hell is that supposed to be? Ari?

Top Ten Tuesday: Characters I Didn’t Click With

It’s Tuesday, September 1st, which means that it’s time for another Top Ten Tuesday, a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme is: Ten Characters You Just Didn’t Click With.

Top Ten Tuesday

1. Pen from Love in the Time of Global Warming  by Francesca Lia Block

I don’t really know why, she was an interesting heroine, I think I just couldn’t suspend my disbelief of the whole situation, so although I liked her, I didn’t quite click with her.

2. Greg from Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews

I mentioned in my review that I wasn’t Greg’s biggest fan, right? He was the thing in the book that kept me from loving it more than I did.

3. Ari from Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

I actually love Ari, but it took me a bit to really be able to connect with him, while Dante was as easy as breathing. Sometimes it annoyed me that Ari’s thoughts and behaviour were so erratic, even though I get the purpose of it.

4. Thomas from The Maze Runner by James Dashner

In all honesty I had trouble connecting to every single character in The Maze Runner, maybe that’s the reason that I still haven’t picked up the second book – though I know I should, before the movie comes out.

5. Gemma from The Year of Taking Chances by Lucy Diamond

From the 3 ladies in the book, Gemma is the one I identified less with, though I was rooting for her, it never entirely clicked.

6. Jasmine from A Whole New World: A Twisted Tale by Liz Braswell

So much so that for a moment there I was almost rooting for Jafar. It was a huge problem in this book, the characters weren’t developed at all, which made it extremely hard to click with any of them. But Jasmine was the worst of all of them, her tendencies to go through the same path that she was supposed to be avoiding, made me cringe.

7. Penny from Girl Online by Zoe Sugg and Siobhan Curham

I really disliked Penny. She could have been adorable and relatable, but she was not!

8. Jessamine Lovelace from The Infernal Devices by Cassandra Clare

JessieIt took me a really long time to actually feel anything for Jessamine. I eventually did, obviously, and by the end I even shed a tear when she died. But Jessie was definitely not an easy girl to love, at least by me.

9. Wren from Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

I had a huge problem connecting with Wren from Fangirl. I hated how she treated her sister. I get that she needed her independence and be her own person, that’s more than fine, but things don’t have to be all or nothing. She could have gone her own way, but not completely forget that she had a sister who also needed her.

10. Jacob from the Twilight Saga by Stephenie Meyer

I was never, even remotely, on team Jacob. I just never really clicked with him… And I kind of liked him (just a tiny bit) more on the movies (because of Taylor Lautner… *not sorry!*). The truth is, I never got why he was so into Bella, because he’s into her more or less from the starts and it annoyed me.

Bout of Books 14: #FictionalWorldTravel

The first challenge of the Bout of Books Read-a-thon is the Fictional World Travel Challenge!

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Basically is to show 3 to 6 books of fiction that take place in countries other than my own. I decided to go ahead and do it because it’s do damn easy – I can’t even remember a book that has action in either Portugal or Spain (not counting national authors).

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  1. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz –  El Paso,Texas, USA
  2. More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera – Bronx, New York City, USA
  3. Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare – Victorian London, UK
  4. Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux – Paris, France
  5. Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden – Kyoto, Japan
  6. The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion – Melbourne, Australia

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Characters Who Are Fellow Book Nerds

And it’s Tuesday again! The Top Ten Tuesday theme this week is “Ten Characters Who Are Fellow Book Nerds“, which surprisingly was harder than I thought to come up with 10. Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. So, without further ado…

Top Ten Tuesday

1. Cath – Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Cath is the ultimate book nerd, she not only loves to read, but she loves to live inside their world. And Cath reading to Levi is the cutest thing ever.

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2. Celaena – Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas

The girl loves a good book, even more than she loves killing (I hope)!

“I can survive well enough on my own — if given the proper reading material.”

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3. Dorian – Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas

The second bookworm in this series is Prince Dorian. Come on, the Prince has a library in his room and it is said several times that he was born more of a reader than a fighter. And it’s so cute that he has books at the ready to send Celaena when she asks for books.

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4 & 5. Tessa and Will – The Infernal Devices by Cassandra Clare

These two are such bookworms. She spends all her time surrounded by books and he knows the books by heart.

“One must always be careful of books, and what is inside them, for words have the power to change us.”

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6. Hermione Granger – Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling

This one is mandatory. I bet not one single person is going to leave Hermione out of this list, am I right? Come on, at 11 the girl read the school manuals before even setting foot at the school.

7. Dante – Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Dante loves to read and shares his love for books with Aristotle. It’s also very cute.

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8. Luke – The Mortal Instruments by Cassandra Clare

Luke has a bookstore, which is kind of cool. Also, he’s one of my favorite characters from the Shadowhunters chronicles :).

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9. Elizabeth Bennet – Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

True that Jane Austen tell us that for a woman to be accomplished she has to read and to all these other stuff, but Lizzie really did enjoy reading.

10. Catherine Morland – Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen

Other of Austen’s heroines that loved to spend a good deal of time with her nose in a book, especially if they were sordid and scandalous…

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books That Celebrate Diversity/Diverse Characters

Here we are, for my second week doing the Top Ten Tuesday. This week’s theme is pretty cool: Ten Books That Celebrate Diversity/Diverse Characters, such as features minority/religious minority, has socioeconomic diversity, disabled main character, a neurotypical character, member of the LGBTQ community, etc… Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish.

Top Ten Tuesday

1. Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

I can’t stress enough how good this book is, you SHOULD READ IT (NOW!). Main character is a gay boy.

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2. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz

A coming of age story set in the 80’s, about two mexican boys who are in love with each other.

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3. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

Charlie suffers from a mental disorder and Patrick is gay. Enough said! (also, I love this book to death!)

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4. The Mortal Instruments series by Cassandra Clare

Do I even need to talk about how much diversity is in these books?! Alec is gay, Magnus is bissexual, Simon is jewish and Maia is African-American. Also, Aline (half-Asian) is in a relationship with Helen (half-faerie bissexual girl).

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5. Love in the Time of Global Warming by Francesca Lia Block

Ok, this one is full of diversity. Pen is bissexual, her boyfriend Hex is transgender, Ezra and Ash (african-american) are gay.loveinthetime

6. My Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warga

First of all, Aysel is Turkish. Then, both she and Roman deal with depression and suicidal tendencies. Have you read this one yet? You should!

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7. Ms Marvel by Willow Wilson

Kamala Khan is a Pakistani-American Muslim girl. Also, she’s a superhero!

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8. The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

Don Tillman most likely has Asperger syndrome…

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9. Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell

Park is half-Korean and Eleanor lives way beyond the line of poverty.

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10. A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

Tyrion Lannister is a dwarf.

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