Let’s Talk About: How I Rate

discussion_howIrateHello guys! I haven’t really been in the mood to write discussion posts these last few weeks, but I’ve been meaning to talk with you about something that I think it’s important and that it’s different for all of us, book readers, reviewers and book bloggers, and that is: How do I rate my books.


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This is a deeply personal thing, no matter how analytical a person can be about what we read, the truth is that the material will always affect us in different ways, and this is true from everything, from the writing, to the characters, to the plot.

The same rating from two different persons can mean two totally different things, and even the same rating from the same person might not mean that the books are comparable.


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Most of us rate on a system of stars, usually from 0 to 5. Websites such as Goodreads, Amazon or Netgalley don’t allow for anything less than full stars, which I always found quite limitative, because a book can not be a 3 stars book, but also not quite reach the 4 stars, for instance.

So, since I started reviewing books a year ago or so, I decided to use all the decimal points allowed. This brought another problem for me, how to separate some books with such a fine colm. And at the end of the day, does it really matter if a book is a 4.2 or 4.3?

I decided to change to an slightly easier system, but not as limitative as the full stars, and that is simply using the half-stars. I rate books from 0 to 5 stars, using the half stars quite often.

But how does it translates to the rating on site such as goodreads?

Well, I’ve always learned in math that a .5 rounds up, so that’s what I do. If I rate a book 3.5 stars, its rating on goodreads will be 4 stars, and so on. It’s not the fairest thing ever, but I rather round up than down.


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Now, a lot of you have the ability to rate individual aspects of the book, such as characters, pacing, plot, world building and so on, and then do a final rating based on the individual aspects.

While I do take all these things into account, I’m an emotional rater. I rate more on how the book made me feel, than how intricate things really were. The deeper a book affects me, the better the chances that it will get a 5 stars rating.


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While some people think that 5 Stars are almost a myth, because for them a 5 stars rating means a perfect book, and no such thing exists, I do not think like that. Oh, don’t get me wrong, there are no perfect things, but a lot of books come really close, and I have no issues doting them with all the stars I can.

If a book makes me feel things, has a kick ass story, characters, plot, and at the end of the read I can’t find a single thing that I would change? Yeah, I’m giving it 5 Stars. 

If you follow my blog at all for a while, you’ll also find that I give 4.5 to 5 stars ratings to a lot of contemporary romances. I love the genre, first of all, and then I think it’s easier to slip up a bit on fantasy or sci-fi…


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Another thing I have no problems with is rating a book 0 or 1 star. It might pain me, because it’s someone’s work, but I am always honest in the way I rate books. So if a book is not for me, or if I feel it deserves a bad rating, that’s what it will get.


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I do! But because I like to read books that I think I’ll enjoy! With this in mind, all of my Netgalley requests and buys, and therefore the books I read, are books that I think I’ll like, or that have been recommended to me by people with similar tastes.

Just because someone has a good average on GR, doesn’t mean that they’re lenient on the way they rate. It means that they know what they like!


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